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Air Ducts

Good Morning All! I was looking thru articles this morning and seen this Dateline NBC on air duct cleaning scammers. I remember seeing this and just wanted to share because this happens everyday.  The main thing to remember when calling and getting quotes on air duct cleaning is asking those key questions. Vent openings, cold air returns, mains, furnace and santizer. Make sure that ALL of this is included in the price they are giving you "OVER THE PHONE" make sure you are asking if the price they are giving you is bottom dollar. Ask if they charge extra for anything like trip charge or Sur charge. The key is QUESTIONS QUESTIONS QUESTIONS. Aardvark has been in business since 1994 and let me tell you there is NO WAY a company can clean your air ducts in your WHOLE house for $49.95 its impossible. That does not even cover the cost of gas these days.

Aardvark has been in this business since 1994 Owned and operated by Jerry and Lori Chevalier. Aardvark does residential as well as commercial air duct cleaning and we also do chimney cleaning and all repairs. We do work for a number of the school districts here in the Metro area. We are members of NADCA, BBB, National Chimney Guild, and Safety Services. We care about our customers and take pride in our work. If you have any questions or want more information about our company or services we offer please fill out the contact info and we will get back to you very quickly! Hope everyone has a wonderful day! Malissa

 

PS I have also included an article from NADCA (good info)

 

 

Air Duct Cleaning Scammers Exposed by Dateline NBC
– January 31, 2011.

 

 

The National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) participated in an undercover investigation by Chris Hansen and Dateline NBC to expose companies that use bait and switch tactics to take advantage of consumers. The investigation culminated in a segment that aired January 30, 2011, featuring NADCA President Buck Sheppard as the industry expert. The National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) participated in an undercover investigation by Chris Hansen and Dateline NBC to expose companies that use bait and switch tactics to take advantage of consumers. The investigation culminated in a segment that aired January 30, 2011, featuring NADCA President Buck Sheppard as the industry expert. After witnessing one of the scam operators in action, Sheppard was taken aback. “It was amazing how unscrupulous some people can actually be,” he noted.

 

 

 

 

The segment focused in part on a representative from a company called Duct Masters, out of Hebron, Kentucky. The consumer called the company expecting the advertised price of $49.95, but instead ended up paying almost $500. Even after paying the higher price, the job was not done properly. Dust and chemicals were released into the living space of the home and the system was still filthy after the Duct Master representatives were finished.

 

 

 

 

Reflecting on the segment that aired Sunday night, Sheppard added, “I believe the Dateline piece was well produced and highlights the need for better oversight by the individual states. For those so-called ‘duct cleaners’ who have no standards by which to measure their work, they should be aware that NADCA and its combined membership are always pushing to better educate our consumers. Through better education, consumers aren’t as likely to fall prey to these types of unscrupulous and shady practitioners, since they know how to choose a professional duct cleaning company. And that's no BS.”

 

 

 

 

NADCA Executive Director John Schulte commented, “These scams are a problem for consumers and legitimate businesses alike. The low-price coupons offered by these bad actors make it difficult for consumers to know what to expect, while also luring business away from legitimate companies. Consumers often end up paying more than necessary without getting their money’s worth.” He noted that being an educated consumer is the best approach to avoiding these scams.

 

 

 

 

According to Dateline, Duct Masters shut down their operation within days after being confronted on camera by Chris Hansen. It remains to be seen whether or not this company will change names and relocate its operation.

 

 

 

 

Get the Job Done Right
NADCA offers the following recommendations to consumers in regards to heating and cooling system cleaning – in layman’s terms, air duct cleaning:

 

 

 

 

  • Have your heating and air conditioning system inspected for cleanliness every one to two years and cleaned if necessary. (When maintained properly, most systems only require cleaning once every three to five years.)
  • If you decide to have your heating and air conditioning system cleaned, learn about the process by viewing one or two of the videos available at www.NADCA.com
  • Have the entire heating and cooling system cleaned, including all components – not just the air ducts. This not only helps to keep the system clean, it also helps the system keep your home warm (or cool) and reduces energy use.
  • Make sure you have an efficient filter on your heating and cooling system, and change (or clean) it regularly – typically every two or three months.
  • Visit www.NADCA.com to find a qualified company in your area. NADCA members are committed to performing their work in accordance with industry standards, as part of NADCA’s Code of Ethics.

 

 

 

 

View the Segment
The Dateline segment is available for viewing at: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/40968816#41303490 Scroll down the list of thumbnail images on the left side of the page to find the portion of the program addressing air duct cleaning (starting with “The Hansen Files, Part 5”).

 

 

 

 

About NADCA
The National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) is a not-for-profit trade association comprised of member companies that provide inspection, cleaning and restoration services for residential and commercial heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. NADCA serves the industry and the public by developing standards that promote best practices, while also training and certifying industry professionals. The Association also sponsors a variety of consumer education programs, available free of charge at www.NADCA.com

 

 

 

 

Contact
For more information or questions about this release, contact Lexi Gray, Director of Publications, at (202) 737-2926, or e-mail to info@nadca.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Clean HVAC System Coils Save Energy

 

 

Dirty coils force compressors to run longer and work harder than required, increasing energy usage and utility costs

 

COURTESY OF NADCA

One of the easiest, most cost-effective green things you can do for your building’s energy efficiency is to have your HVAC system’s condenser and evaporator coils inspected yearly and cleaned as necessary. Dirty coils force compressors to run longer and work harder than required, increasing energy usage and utility costs while decreasing component life and occupant comfort.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), major utilities, and other experts, dirty condenser and evaporator coils can significantly increase HVAC energy usage and associated utility costs. The U.S. DOE says that “a dirty condenser coil can increase compressor energy consumption by 30 percent.” A dirty evaporator coil decreases airflow, resulting in reduced heat transfer and a degradation of the dehumidification process. These can cause overall air quality to decline and systems to fail, and decrease the life expectancy of motors due to increased heat while running.

NADCA Standards

The ACR 2006 Standard for HVAC Assessment, Cleaning and Restoration includes details regarding methodologies for coil cleaning and occupant protection strategies. It also helps building owners and managers quantify HVAC-system performance before and after cleaning, calling for HVAC systems to operate within 10 percent of their nominal and/or design volumetric flow after coil cleaning (other factors aside). Using NADCA-certified air-system cleaning specialists ensures that the systems are properly cleaned and maintained for increased energy efficiency and reduced energy consumption.

Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) suggests an annual coil cleaning to its commercial customers as part of its ongoing efforts to promote energy-efficient HVAC-system operations. “Once the system has been properly charged with refrigerant and has good airflow across the indoor coil, and assuming there is no damage to the duct system, only basic service, such as changing filters and cleaning the outdoor unit annually, should be needed to maintain the system operation at peak performance levels,” says PG&E.

With the HVAC system running in “cool” mode, there are two places where heat exchange occurs: 1) condensing unit coils, and 2) evaporator coils. Foreign materials on these coils act as unintended insulators and inhibit the free flow of air through the coils, decreasing the rate of heat transfer between coil and air that is the basis of most HVAC systems. Further, experience shows that servicing dirty systems can lead to misdiagnosing problems and/or faulty or unnecessary repairs. Typically, this results in overcharging of systems and premature failure.

It’s not just old systems that need cleaning. In fact, the newer and more efficient your HVAC system is, the more likely it is to benefit from regular coil inspection and cleaning. These newer systems operate at greatly increased pressures and are less tolerant of increases in static pressure. While clean coils have always been important, today’s higher-efficiency units require more efficient heat transfer across larger coils to function at their highest capacity. New units with high SEER ratings often have variable-speed fan motors that adjust fan speed based on demand; however, these units lose much of their effectiveness when forced to run harder than necessary due to fouled condenser vanes.

An effective coil inspection and cleaning requires more than hosing down the vanes on an exterior compressor coil. The National Air Duct Cleaners Association’s (NADCA) ACR 2006 Standard for HVAC Assessment, Cleaning and Restoration sets minimum best practices for coil cleaning.

 

Building Use

Air-Handling Unit

Supply Ductwork

Return Ductwork/Exhaust

Industrial

1 year

1 year

1 year

Residential

1 year

2 years

2 years

Light Commercial

1 year

2 years

2 years

Commercial

1 year

2 years

2 years

Healthcare

1 year

1 year

1 year

Marine

1 year

2 years

2 years

Robert “Buck” Sheppard is president of the Washington, D.C.-based National Air Duct Cleaners Association.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 8, 2011

Air Duct Cleaning Scammers!

Good Morning All! I was looking thru articles this morning and seen this Dateline NBC on air duct cleaning scammers. I remember seeing this and just […]
Aardvark Residential and Commercial Services | 13015 6th St | Grandview, MO 64030 | (816) 945-6070